Alzheimer's Prevention - nutrition & lifestyle habits to optimise brain health
  • Positive action on Alzheimer’s

    Half of the risk for developing dementia and Alzheimer’s is preventable and most of this risk relates to nutrition and lifestyle factors.

    Take our cognitive function test

What is Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is characterised by a progressive loss of cognitive function including memory, language, judgment, praxis and orientation and is diagnosed on the basis of shrinking in the thickness of the medial temporal lobe, which is considered to be the primary pathology that generates the associated symptoms.

Preventing Alzheimer’s

Preventing Alzheimer’s

Half of the risk for developing dementia and Alzheimer’s is preventable and most of this risk relates to nutrition and lifestyle factors.

Action Plan

Read more to find out about key modifiable lifestyle and dietary factors that can help to lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

Lowering Homocysteine

It is now well established that homocysteine is a risk factor in the development of Alzheimer’s, and we know that this depends on optimal B vitamin status. Read more about the research and the importance of campaigning about this preventative strategy.

The Six Alzheimer’s Prevention Steps

Eating one serving of oily fish a week is associated with halving the risk of Alzheimer’s. Supplements of one kind of omega 3 fish oil, called DHA, have been shown to enhance memory in adults who don’t eat fish, and to prevent memory loss in those in the early stages of memory decline. But it’s not just oily fish. The more fish you eat, the better your memory test performance. Fish is also an excellent source of vitamins B12, D and choline, all essential for the brain. Chia and flax seeds are also an excellent source of omega 3.

Our recommendations

Eat fish at least twice a week, seeds on most days and supplement omega 3 fish oils.

The best fish for Omega 3, the fat that’s linked with improving mood, are: mackerel (1,400mg per 100g/3oz) herring/kipper (1,000mg) sardines (1,000mg),fresh tuna (900mg), anchovy (900mg), salmon (800mg), trout (500mg). Tuna, being high in mercury, is best eaten not more than twice a month. Swordfish and marlin are best avoided or eaten very infrequently for the same reason..

The best seeds are flax seeds and pumpkin seeds. Flax seeds are so small they are best ground and sprinkled on cereal. Alternatively, use flax seed oil, for example in salad dressings. While technically providing omega 3 only about 5% of the type of omega 3 (alpha linolenic acid) in these seeds is converted in your body into EPA.

To help reduce brain inflammation, we recommend supplementing with omega 3 fish oils, as well as eating oily fish twice a week. The ideal amount for maximizing memory and mental health is likely to be in the region of 300 mg of EPA and 200 mg of DHA daily, and double or triple this if you have age-related memory decline.

Also minimise your intake of fried foods.

Help us raise awareness

Your support can help us continue our work in generating awareness about the importance of optimum nutrition and lifestyle changes to support cognitive health and help prevent Alzheimer’s.

Take our test

Our cognitive function test can help you identify early signs of cognitive decline, as well as give some personalised dietary and lifestyle guidance to help you take positive steps to prevent Alzheimer’s.

How the test works

Our cognitive function test can help you identify early signs of cognitive decline, as well as give some personalised dietary and lifestyle guidance to help you take positive steps to prevent Alzheimer’s.

About the cognitive function test

Although Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is usually diagnosed above the age of 70, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) can be detected from as young as age 50. The online Cognitive Function Test aims to provide a tool for individuals to self-assess their level of MCI in the cognitive domains that predict AD.

Interpreting your results

Your test score has already been adjusted for age, education and computer skill level. These are factors that we know affect the test score in a predictable fashion and the adjustments are based on our pilot study and concur with already published research.

FAQ

Read answers to common questions about the cognitive function test and gain further support.

Key Research in Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention

There is a growing body of research demonstrating the importance of nutrition and lifestyle factors in the development of Alzheimer’s. Explore our resources on up to date findings and the steps we need to take to help prevent cognitive decline

Methylation and Homocysteine

Homocysteine is a naturally occurring amino acid produced as part of the body’s methylation process. The level of homocysteine in the plasma is increasingly being recognised as a risk factor for disease and seen as a predictor of potential health problems such as cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s.

Learn more

We have a number of educational videos on nutrition and brain health that you may be interested in viewing.